Tag: positive nutrition

A Look Back at 2018

A Look Back at 2018

Grateful for 2018

A Look Back at Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services and the L’ifestyle Lounge in the Media!

by the Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Team

Can you believe 2018 is almost at an end? We’re getting closer to that time when we reflect on our favorite moments of the year and think about what we want to accomplish in the future. Given that, Laura thought it would be an ideal time to compile all the articles we’ve been quoted in this year – to give you the latest health news from our perspective – and to talk about what we hope for in 2019.

This past month the L’ifestyle Lounge was featured in the Bergen Record. Laura was quoted in “Minivan musings: Practicing mindfulness can help children.” (The L’ifestyle Lounge is located in North Jersey – Closter, in case you didn’t know.) Writer Jackie Goldschneider opened the article by saying she honestly did not know a lot about mindfulness. Therefore, Laura took it as her job to educate her! She spoke of the “four prongs” of mindfulness, which include “being aware in the moment; being present in the moment; being nonjudgmental; and narrating to yourself as you go along.” She explained that it can help children manage their stress and impulsivity – and can be valuable when they’re in school. She also gave easy hints to incorporate mindfulness into your child’s life every day.

The Bergen Mama highlighted the L’ifestyle Lounge in their article “Learn to Love Both Kale and Cupcakes at the L’ifestyle Lounge in Closter NJ.” They took notice that we embrace a wellness plan that does not glorify diets but looks at overall health.

In early October, Marie Claire interviewed Laura about those “appetite-suppressing” lollipops Kim Kardashian advertised on her Instagram. The article was called “How Are Appetite Suppressing Lollipops Still a Thing?” Laura is not a fan of suppressing the appetite or of Kim Kardashian advertising such products, but she wanted to help Marie Claire investigate the nutritional science behind these pops. The research on these pops lead one to believe they may help with emotional eating, but Laura would need to see more research before saying that for sure. One thing we know is that they are expensive. “I’d be interested to know how many regular people end up actually buying these lollipops more than once,” wrote Allie Conti. “My guess is that, more than any reality star’s endorsement, Flat Tummy Co’s success may rely on girls selling each other these candies to get commission once they decide they’ve wasted their own money.” And just a reminder – regular old-fashioned lollipops can always be found at your local dollar store, and if you are a nervous person who finds you need help with emotional eating, consider reading “Intuituive Eating” by Evelyn Tribole and Elyse Resche.

About six months ago, Laura contributed to an article titled “Foods You Should Never Buy Generic” for Readers’ Digest, all about generic foods that aren’t worth your hard-earned dollars. Laura thinks it’s worth it to buy the brand name when it comes to soup because she wants her soup to be made with whole food ingredients — don’t you? The article also points out that you may get additives in generic yogurt.

Travel + Leisure quoted Laura about  “The Best Time to Drink Your Morning Coffee.”  She said you should aim to have it “when the body is producing less cortisol, about three to four hours after waking.” You don’t want to crash harshly later in the day and this can help with that. Give it a shot.

If you have diabetes in your family, or if your doctor has told you you’re at possible risk for prediabetes, you may feel defeated. But you don’t need to be! Prediabetes doesn’t need to be your fate. Laura worked with US News, and one of her favorite writers, K. Aleisha Fetters, to bring you simple ways to limit your chances of developing prediabetes — in the article called “Got Prediabetes? 6 Nutrition Tips You Need to Follow.” One of the key things to remember is that you do not have to cut carbohydrates out of your life. That is a myth! Moderating and sometimes lowering your daily carb count and choosing whole carbs are strategies that can serve you well. An easy tip is to just eat – breakfast, that is. Do it one hour after you wake up to help balance your body clock (read more in Women’s Health Body Clock Diet).

Laura, Elizabeth Adler and Lisa Mikus were all quoted in a Prevention article titled “The 30 Healthiest Foods You Can Eat at Every Major Fast Food Chain.” For those who believe nutritious eating doesn’t mix with an “on-the-go” lifestyle, we beg to differ! Lisa recommends Popeye’s 3-piece Blackened Chicken Tenders and Zucchini Romesco from Noodles & Co, and Laura likes Broccoli Beef from Panda Express, among other options. Elizabeth likes the Roast Turkey Farmhouse Salad from Arby’s.  Elizabeth and Laura were both quoted in Prevention’s 30 Anti-Aging Foods for Beautiful Skin. Fantastic skin starts from the inside. Feed your body and it will affect your glow! Elizabeth says just a small amount of cinnamon in your coffee could do the trick.

 

 

Laura was also proud to participate as a speaker at a number of events in 2018:

  • NEDA con 2018 Philadelpia on Saturday, May 12, 2018, where she presented Self-Care Tools for Sustaining Recovery. This was NEDA’s First Regional Conference held at Drexel University and audience size was 100.
  • Giuliana Rancic’s “The Pink Agenda” TPA Talks (a division of Breast Cancer Research Foundation) on Thursday, June 7, 2018 at The Sheen Center for Thought and Culture. The theme of the talk was You are More Than You Eat – Don’t Blame Yourself for Breast Cancer. Laura spoke about learning to eat all foods using the 21 Pillars to Positive Nutrition.” Laura spoke along with physicians, researchers, breast cancer survivors and previvors on empowering a positive lifestyle.
  • The Thriving Child, Happy Child Summit on June 9 and 10, 2018, where Laura spoke on the Eat Kale and Cupcakes philosophy that has defined her nutritional practice.

 

At L’ifestyle Lounge, we started our Fall 2018 yoga series in September, which includes our Paint and Poses series for grades K-4 and EmpowHer for ages 11-14, plus Tai Chi, which is returning in late November. We are so happy to have begun our L’ifestyle Book Club, which is a free event we are proud to offer the community. Our next one takes place on November 14, 7pm. We’ll be reading The Weight of Being by Kara Richardson Whitely. January’s book is Beautful Boy By David Sheff. We choose books that focus on wellness to inspire and help create meaning in your life. Consider this my personal invitation to join us for book club. Sign-up either yourself or your child up for our yoga classes. Our schedule is always available at this link.

L’ifestyle Lounge is excited about all we’ve accomplished in 2018, and look forward to bringing you more yoga classes, community events, and health advice in 2019! Stay tuned in with us and tuned-in to your “self.”

5 Weeks to Mindfulness: Lunch Series for Beginner to Intermediate Yogis

5 Weeks to Mindfulness: Lunch Series for Beginner to Intermediate Yogis

5 Weeks to Mindfulness 

Lunch Series for Beginner to Intermediate Yogis

 

Bring a mat, take a seat to learn the definition of mindfulness and how to apply it to every aspect of your daily living from walking to eating to practicing yoga.

Over five Tuesdays, you will transform your lifestyle with Closter’s L’ifestyle Lounge Lunch Series led by registered dietitian and registered yoga teacher, Elyssa Toomey. Starting Oct 10th from 12:00 to 12:50 pm, you will learn what mindfulness is, how to eat mindfully, breathe mindfully (mindfulness meditation) and live a more mindful, healthy life. The practice of yoga – binding breath with movement will be introduced sessions three through five.

Dates: Oct 17 through Nov 21; No class Oct 31.

Cost: $195.00. Please bring your own yoga mat. Expect to move sessions 3 through 5.

Session 1

Mindfulness 101

Basics, mindful breathing and eating

Session 2

How To Do

How to eat and walk mindfully

Intro to basic asanas/yoga poses

Session 3

Stress Reduction 101

Mindfulness and stress reduction

Yoga practice 20 min

Session 4

Mindful Eating Challenge

(The art of eating chocolate cake and chips, mindfully)

Yoga practice 30 min

Session 5

Practice

Mindfulness meditation and yoga 45 minutes

 

Email: lifestylelounge@lauracipullo.com for more information or sign up here.

Favorite Summer Meals to Eat Before Summer is Over

Favorite Summer Meals to Eat Before Summer is Over

Favorite Summer Meals to Eat Before Summer is Over

By Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

Summer is not over yet! Give some of a my favorite summer recipes a try!

California Grilled Chicken

(Recipe hint: Serve over Zoodles!)

Grilled Pork Tacos with Mango Salsa

(Recipe Hint: Serve with Guac!)

Easy and Yum: Steak Burrito Bowl Recipe

Trendy bowls dinners: Quinoa Chicken Bowls with a Mango Salsa

Powerhouse delivered in a bowl: High Protein Onion, Apple, Quinoa, and Kale Salad

Should you go Paleo?

Seamless Exposed: The Secret Behaviors Surrounding a Seamless Meal Order

Seamless Exposed: The Secret Behaviors Surrounding a Seamless Meal Order

Seamless Exposed: The Secret Behaviors Surrounding a Seamless Meal Order

Laura Cipullo, RD, CEDRD, NYC, NY and Closter, NJ

The company Seamless originally launched in 1999, as SeamlessWeb is an online system for ordering meal delivery. It seems like such a great idea for convenience. You create an account, store your credit card information, and voila, now you have a seamless experience ordering takeout/delivery food. Why is there shame surrounding use of this service? Why do I recommend some of my clients to cancel their account? The short answer is an anonymous meal delivery system, effortlessly accessed by the tap of your finger at any time of day, is a dangerous accomplice to binge eating. You eat large amounts of food in an uncontrollable manner in the privacy of your home. The only human interaction needed is receiving the meal from the delivery person. It is you and the food until the food is gone leaving you to feel shame and guilt.

 

Don’t get me wrong, services like Seamless are not to blame, nor are they the cause of a binge eating episode (keep in mind, binge eating is a form of an eating disorder found in the DSMV). Rather, the anonymity and ease of this service allow emotional eaters and binge eaters alike to order a lot of food or multiple meals from multiple restaurants in one very short period of time. The customer may order Chinese food from food establishment A and a cheeseburger with cheese fries from food establishment B. There is no face-to-face accountability, and this removes the inhibitions as well as perceived and or feared judgment. The binge eater becomes the only person to judge his/her food and the act of eating his/her food. This person already feels shame when feeling hungry, when thinking about food and even more when someone sees him/her buying, ordering, and eating food. Seamless and other web-based meal delivery services remove this immediate shame, but in the end it bites you in the rear.

 

I would guesstimate that once week, a client reports ordering his/her binge foods from an online meal service, which is then followed by eating in an uncontrollable manner. In no way does this act of eating remove the individual’s guilt. While it may be easier for the person to order the food, it is still an act of self-soothing or self-sabotage. My clients feel shame when just reporting this behavior. I never want my client or any individual to feel shame. In an effort to change this behavior and prevent impulsive actions, I typically encourage the client to delete the app and remove his/her credit card from the account. We are simultaneously working on creating and following a meal structure further supported by using mindfulness or coping skills. The goal is create awareness and give the client the opportunity to change his/her harmful behavior. When a client identifies the urge to binge, he/she will have to download the app again and re-enter credit card information, delaying the binge and therefore, helping to create a new neuro-pathway. Option 2 would be to stop the impulsive mindless ordering and instead eat adequately throughout the day, as well as use breath work or mindfulness to identify and address the thoughts, feelings, and behaviors in the moment.

 

While online meal delivery services offer a great convenience, think twice before downloading the app or storing your credit card information in your account. If you have a tendency to eat for emotional reasons and/or suffer from Binge Eating Disorder, consider developing a plan of action with your certified eating disorders registered dietitian!

 

Work, Move, and Be Mindful of Your Seamless Account.

 

Fueling Your Passion: Ensuring Adequate Nutrition for the Athlete

Fueling Your Passion: Ensuring Adequate Nutrition for the Athlete

Fueling Your Passion
Ensuring Adequate Nutrition for the Athlete

By Laura Cipullo Whole Nutrition Services Team

In this post, please note that another name for sugar is glucose.

Calling all athletes!

Whether you’re running the NYC marathon or your first triathlon, nutrition is an important key to performance excellence. Knowing the best foods to eat before, during, and after you compete is essential for a successful event and, of course, not “bonking out”! Here’s the lowdown for fueling your race.

2 to 3 days before the event:

Consume a meal consisting mostly of carbohydrates, moderate amounts of protein plus some amounts of fat; it’s the most favorable repast for athletes before entering a competition. Eat simple, easy to digest (lower in fiber) carbohydrates such as white bread and pasta approximately two to three days before you compete. Louis Burke, PhD, recommends this lower residue intake to minimize intestinal contents —and therefore prevent the need for bowel movements during the event.1 Eating this way is a key element of running free from bloat and gas during the competition.

This meal focuses on carbohydrates because they are digested faster than protein and fat, thus providing the muscles with adequate glucose (sugar) for glycogen stores (your body’s storage form of glucose). This gives athletes enough energy reserves to maintain higher and longer levels of intensity during the event.2 Adequate glucose storage in the muscles will prevent you from experiencing weakness and fatigue when participating in events requiring extra endurance.

Pre-competition meal:

Eating your pre-event meal three to four hours before the game or race is another key element to performing at your very best. A balanced meal will provide you with the maximum available energy you need for competition. Giving your body enough time to digest the meal is key.3

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Here are some good examples of pre-competition meals—to be consumed 3 to 4 hours before the event:

  • Cheerios with low-fat milk and fruit-flavored Greek yogurt with banana
  • Omelet with cheese and baked hash brown potatoes
  • White English muffin with avocado and hummus and an applesauce side
  • Bagel with natural peanut butter and jam
  • Turkey on white bread with a low-fat yogurt
  • White pasta with pesto and shrimp

Hydration: 2 cups 2 hours before—and 2 cups during!

Keeping yourself well hydrated both before and during exercise is essential to successful performance. Drinking two cups of fluid (8 oz. per cup) at least two hours before your event can be helpful in preventing dehydration. It’s also important to make sure that you drink another two cups of water for every hour you are competing.5 Preventing dehydration can keep you from feeling fatigued and can prevent your muscles from cramping during your competition. If you’re an athlete participating in an event lasting over an hour, you should also think about electrolyte depletion. Excessive sweating causes you to lose important electrolytes such as sodium and potassium—and can adversely affect your performance. To replace lost electrolytes, consider choosing a sports drink such as Gatorade which will aid in electrolyte repletion and rehydration. Sports drinks usually contain carbohydrates, sodium and potassium. Gatorade (and other sports drinks formulated especially for athletes include water, glucose/sugar and electrolytes) provides the ideal ratio for rehydration and repletion of electrolytes and glycogen stores.6

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Recovery foods:

Recovery foods to consume at your post-event meals are just as important as your pre-event meals. During exercise, your body breaks down its muscle glycogen stores. When your body uses the available glucose in your blood, it needs to switch to reserves. It can quickly break glycogen down into glucose which causes the glycogen stores to become depleted. Due to this breakdown, replenishing your body with carbohydrates is crucial for adequate recovery.7 Make sure you eat enough carbohydrates to restore the glycogen in the muscles that was depleted during the event. Protein will help to repair the muscles that were stressed. Antioxidants are also beneficial at this time; they aid in repairing any free radical damage that occurred during your intense exercise. In general, consuming carbs and proteins within thirty minutes of your workout is ideal for muscle recovery. This muscle recovery period will last for about 30 minutes to four hours post exercise.

Here are some post-event meal ideas to help you recover and prepare for your next workout:

  • Oat bagel toasted with almond butter and fresh strawberries
  • Whole grain wrap with grilled chicken, hummus and tricolor peppers
  • Whole-wheat burrito with white rice, beans and veggies
  • Grilled salmon and quinoa with steamed squash
  • Smoothie with low-fat milk, banana, peanut butter, protein powder and wheat germ
  • Spaghetti and meatballs with spinach

On average, it’s recommended that a female athlete (about 5’4” and 140 lbs.) consume approximately 500 grams of carbohydrates and 76 to 89 grams of protein per day. It’s recommended that a male athlete (about 6’0” and 180 lbs.) consume approximately 700 grams of carbohydrates and 98 to 113 grams of protein per day.7

Providing yourself with the proper energy foods both before and after your competition can make a huge difference in your performance. Eating a low residue, carbohydrate rich diet is important for your pre-event meal while eating within thirty minutes of a competition is crucial for your post-event recovery. What you feed your body both before and after competition can be the most important key for turning an adequate performance in your event into an excellent one!

 

What do you eat before and after an event? What foods work for your body? Do you have any secrets to your success that you can share with our readers?

References:

1. “Conference Highlights.” Scan’s Pulse. Spring 2014; 33(2):16-18. 06 Apr. 2014.

2. “Pre-Event Meals.” American College of Sports Medicine. www.acsm.org. Accessed April 13, 2014.

3. Berning J, Neville K. “From The Sandlot to the Olympics Fueling Athletes A Key To Success.” Dry Bean Quarterly. Beaninstitute.com. 2014. Accessed April 6, 2014.

4. Berning J, Manroe M, Meyer NL. “Recommendations for Fitness Athletes on Food and Fluid Consumption.” Gatorade Sports Science Institute. Accessed April 13, 2014.

5. Jeffrey, K. “How to Hydrate Before, During, and After a Workout.” Active.com. N.p.n.d. Web. Accessed April 6, 2014.

6. Caldwell J. “Sports Drinks: Are they effective in improving Athletic Performance?”  Vanderbilt University Psychology Department. http://www.vanderbilt.edu/AnS/psychology/health_psychology/gatorade.htm. Accessed April 13, 2014.

7. The Position Statement from the Dietitians of Canada, the American Dietetic Association, and the American College of Sports Medicine, Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research in the Winter of 2000, 61(4):176-192. Accessed April 13, 2014.

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